Tag Archive: science


What’s So Great About Eye Contact?

You’ve probably heard that eye contact is important. It’s one of the first things you’ll learn if you take a course in public speaking. They’ll tell you eye contact demonstrates confidence and engages listeners. That’s true. Even Cuddle Labs has stipulated that eye contact is one of the integral elements of a good cuddle. But did you know that there is a whole field of research dedicated to exploring the significance, perceived and biological, of eye contact? It’s called Oculesics, and it’s revealed a lot of really interesting information pertaining to cuddling. Most pertinent is the discovery that prolonged eye contact stimulates the production of oxytocin, just like a social touch.

So, think about your own experiences with eye contact. If you live in a big city, like me, you may find yourself wondering about it a lot, thanks to a city’s tendency to push a bunch of total strangers into a small space for an extended period of time (like the subway). Usually, if my eyes meet someone else’s, both lookers quickly look away. Why is that? What makes eye contact uncomfortable in that situation? And what if I maintain eye contact? Keeping a straight face feels totally weird. I have to smile. And if I smile, the person I’m looking at will usually smile back. So eye contact is either awkward or induces smiling. Weird.

We feel these ways because eye contact is actually a very intimate behavior. It feels uncomfortable if you’re not feeling intimate with the other participant. It feels just the same as it might if you hugged that same person, or if they hugged you. It crosses a boundary that we only take down when we’re feeling safe and open. It’s really like a hands-free cuddle. And don’t forget about these same feelings coming up with people you do know. So much can be communicated solely through eye contact. So what’s going on here? Why does eye contact feel so similar to physical contact?  Continue reading

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My good friend alerted me to this awesome and short article from The Atlantic and I wanted to pass it along to anyone who likes Cuddle Labs! So here’s the link:

A Whiff of Extroversion: Sniffing Oxytocin Could Make Us Outgoing

Soon to come: Want to show your Cuddle Pride? While you wait for Cuddle Labs itself to start making merchandise, we will aggregate some sites that already make cuddle-related products. For starters, check out this oxytocin necklace from made with molecules.

Exciting Times at Cuddle Labs

An unloadably dangerous cuddling position.

Cuddle Labs does the hard research, so you don't have to.

Cuddle Labs is hard at work, pushing the boundaries of cuddling research and reformulating our web design.  We’ve been lax in sharing the knowledge of late, and we apologize for that. But we have continued to hungrily accumulate it, so stay tuned as regular updates resume this week! Things will only get cuddlier from here on out.

For now, stay cuddly, and stay warm.

Welcome, Nick Frost followers!

Nick Frost putting Simon Pegg into a Headlock

Nick giving a... perhaps... overenthusiastic hug? to friend Simon Pegg.

Amazing actor Nick Frost gave us a shoutout on Twitter today–and it’s getting us more traffic than we’ve ever had before. We’re so grateful! Thanks, Nick! You are owed a great many cuddles. Everyone go see The Adventures of Tin Tin!

Ahem, sorry… we’re quite excited. To all our new visitors, welcome. If you’d like to catch up on the cuddle science we’ve shared so far, please check out some of our best posts:

And if you’re wondering exactly what in the world you’ve arrived at, please visit our first post. It will explain everything.

…It will explain as much as can be explained.

The flood of research on oxytocin doesn’t seem to be stopping anytime soon! (And we couldn’t be happier about it.) Just yesterday, CNN reported on a new study from Oregon State University, which seemed to indicate that empathy and social skills are strongly influenced by variations in an oxytocin receptor gene.

In the study, OSU scientists swabbed saliva from one partner in each of 23 couples they’d recruited, in order to test for their variant of the gene. They then videotaped them listening as their partner described a difficult time in their lives. Next, the scientists played the videos, muted, for another group of 116 people. They asked this group to rate the recorded partners on kindness, caring, and trustworthiness based solely on body language.

The gene in question can manifest in any of “GG,” “GA,” or “AA” variants. Six out of the 10 partners judged “most prosocial” were found to possess the “GG” genotype for the receptor gene; 9 of the 10 “least trustworthy” partners were found to possess at least one “A” variant. Continue reading

Cuddle Labs’ Plan

Here at Cuddle Labs, we believe that our knowledge of practical cuddling technique is what separates us from other cuddling theorists. We are, if you will, the world’s leading Cuddle Engineers. (We prefer to leave the more-expensive, less-soft scientific inquiry into the reason for our existence—oxytocin—in better-suited hands.) While an earlier post laid out our overarching cuddling framework, we’ve yet to tell you what the future of the site holds in store.

Magic 8-Ball Response: "Don't Count on It."

"Are you going to become a webcomic?"

In upcoming posts, Cuddle Labs will provide a great deal of “cuddling position” posts, suggesting different cuddling techniques and detailing their important features. Because Cuddle Labs is concerned with the optimization of all your physical social contact, these positions will fall into a number of categories. To find out more, read on. Continue reading

Defining Cuddling, Spooning, and Other Comfy Words

When discussing scientific phenomena, it’s important to define your terms. After all, if you think that spooning and cuddling are the same thing (as some people seem to,) you’ll be awfully confused when we rail against the former and celebrate the latter. As a result, we felt it was necessary to dedicate a post to explaining what we intend when we use many common touch-related words. See our definitions after the jump! Continue reading

Oxytocin: More Good News

We’ve been waiting for this one to become available for a long time. Ladies and gentlemen, a talk by neuroeconomist and oxytocin scholar Paul Zak has gone online at TED.com. In it, he details his personal research on the “cuddle hormone,” suggesting that its effects may be even greater than previously imagined. Zak argues that oxytocin is the “moral molecule,” responsible for human goodness—and he brings the science to back it up.

All Cuddle Labs fans should watch this video. Zak’s research on oxytocin has uncovered yet more reasons for the work that we do. Cuddling deserves consideration! This talk explains why.

Oxytocin: The Real Elixir of Love

I don’t know about you, but I always dreamed of discovering a magical potion that would melt away my sorrows and fill me with a sense of warmth and love for all humanity.

Love Potion

Of course, as I grew older, I realized this was an unrealistic goal. And then I started my research on cuddling!

Turns out, humans naturally produce an amazing chemical that really can improve our lives all around. If you’ve read other Cuddle Labs posts (or the title of this post) you’ll know the chemical to which I refer is… OXYTOCIN!

Continue reading

Cuddle Away the Cold!

Penguins covered in snow

It's cold.

The winter is bearing down upon us in the Northern Hemisphere. We can think of no better reminder of this fact than that it’s snowing today in New York… and it’s not even Halloween yet.

It’s only going to get colder, but there’s no sense in lying down and taking it. Lie down and fight it! Cuddling’s a great (, free!, fun!) way to keep warm while the mercury falls, which makes this the perfect time to start brushing up on your snuggling skills. If you’re staying inside today (Halloween weekend be damned), find somebody to stay in with you—even if it means you have to coax them into going outside first. You’ll benefit from increased warmth as well as increased oxytocin levels.

“Cuddle more” is the most important suggestion that we give vis-à-vis cuddling, and that message is certainly at the core of this post. But, if you need some extra help (maybe some advice on technique) check out our most important posts so far! You’ll be on the way to a cuddling black belt in no time.

And either way, stay warm, and stay cuddle-hungry.

Children Riding a Sled in the Snow, Cuddled Together

We hope this image inspires you to achieve cuddling excellence.

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